Production Specs: The Custodian of Records

Production_Specs_TCOR_strettoblaster
Si sa pochissimo sul misterioso The Custodian Of Records, anche detto TCOR, autodefinitosi “Broke Culture Vulture. Beat Maker”, se non che viene dal New Jersey e che ha un blog e un bandcamp. Sicuramente uno studioso dell’epoca d’oro dell’hip hop, il Custode ha gusti classici e un orecchio di un certo livello, proprio come piace a noi. Autore di un certo numero di tape dal suono sporco e polveroso, negli ultimi anni TCOR si è fatto notare in particolare per beats come Mau Mau, di Mr. Muthafuckin’ eXquire featuring Maffew Ragazino, e RZA, del nostro amico Hus Kingpin. Il suo (ottimo) soundcloud è qui.

 

First commercial beat sold/placed: Shawn Lov’s Blackout of 77 album, released on Nuff Said Records (based in Australia).

How long did it take you to produce something that you were proud of: I either try and get the beat done as soon as possible, or add things little by little…let the samples marinate, maybe replace the snare…or look for an additional sample from another record…all depends.

Favourite production set-up: I don’t have one ha…that’s why I’m trying to make some money off this music stuff (Yeah right, ha.)

Best digging advice from someone ever: I was told not to go to the common records…that pretty much got me into the more obscure sounding stuff…My own tip: don’t just study the cover. Go in the liner notes…see who arranged it, read how many different instruments were played. The year the record was released. What record label it’s on, etc…

Producer, in the last 3 months, that made you say: “Oh, shit, i have to go back to the lab!”: A lot of these new boom bap guys are hacks in every sense of the word but there are a lot of great producers I’ve gotten into via soundcloud. Too many to name, but most of them hail from Europe. I really like those cats The Arch Druids though… they got some dope shit. And this cat Croup, producer of Supastition’s latest EP Honest Living. That guy has some shit (I believe he’s from overseas as well).

Your worst production mistake ever made: Giving a beat to someone who two tracks the beat and then the engineer (who happens to “produce” as well) does what I call a “hater mix” where they purposely make your track sound shitty (i.e. turning it way down while the vocals are way up). Or getting involved in projects I later regret having any part in. I wouldn’t call these things mistakes though…it’s all a learning process.

One essential mixing tip: I’m still turning knobs, learning myself so I don’t think I’m in a position to tell anyone how to mix. I would suggest trial and error as an effective method in getting the sound you want. Sometimes it works for me, sometimes it doesn’t.

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